Discover Maryland's Herps

Field Guide to Maryland's Frogs and Toads (Order Anura)

Tree Frogs (Family Hylidae)

New Jersey Chorus Frog
Pseudacris kalmi


Adult New Jersey Chorus Frog, photo courtesy of Rebecca Chalmers
Adult New Jersey Chorus Frog, photo courtesy of Rebecca Chalmers

Adult New Jersey Chorus Frog, photo courtesy of John White
Adult New Jersey Chorus Frog, photo courtesy of John White

Size

  • - 1 inches
  • Appearance

  • Small pale grey to dark brown treefrog with whitish undersides.
  • Three broad dark stripes (which may be broken) down the back.
  • Small toe disks and feet only slightly webbed.
  • Usually dark line or other marking between eyes, which may be in shape of triangle.
  • Habitat

  • A frog of many habitats, forested or open, but usually heard calling during breeding season in open shallow bodies of water, including roadside ditches, flooded pastures and hayfields.
  • They typically call hidden in a clump of herbaceous vegetation within or immediately next to the flooded area.
  • Found on the Delmarva Peninsula only where it is very common.
  • How to Find

  • These are our earliest breeding frog, with large choruses heard from February to early April.
  • Look carefully in grass and sedge clumps in shallow wet areas.
  • The call has been likened to the sound produced by running your finger over the small teeth of a comb, with the call speeding up and rising in pitch at the end, “teeeeee”, also “preeep”.
  • Calls day or night.
  • Maryland Distribution Map
    Maryland Distribution Map for New Jersey Chorus Frog

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    Maryland Amphibian
    and Reptile Atlas Project

    "A Joint Project of the Natural History Society of Maryland, Inc. and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources"

    For monthly newsletters of the Maryland Amphibian & Reptile Atlas Project click on Recent Newsletters and scroll down to the MARA Newsletters.

    The Maryland Herpetology Field Guide is a cooperative effort of the MD Natural Heritage Program and the MD Biological Stream Survey within the Department of Natural Resources and their partners. We wish to thank all who contributed field records, text, and photographs, as well as support throughout its development.