Discover Maryland's Herps

Field Guide to Maryland's Frogs and Toads (Order Anura)

Narrow-mouthed Toads (Family Microhylidae)

Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad
Gastrophryne carolinensis

Photo of adult Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad, courtesy of John White
Photo of adult Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad, courtesy of John White

Size

  • ⅞ - 1 inches 
  • Record - 1 inches
  • Appearance

  • Shape is unlike any other toad or frog. 
  • A rotund body, narrow and sharp-pointed head and very small mouth. 
  • It has the chameleon-like ability to change color fairly rapidly, but body coloration is usually varying shades of gray, brown, or reddish. 
  • It typically has a lighter colored blotch or line separating the darker back from the grayer sides.
  • Its skin has a granular knobby appearance.
  • Photo of juvenile Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad, courtesy of KJohnson
    Juvenile Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad,
    photo courtesy of K. Johnson

    Photo of Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad Habitat courtesy of Rebecca Chalmers
    Photo of Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad Habitat
    courtesy of Rebecca Chalmers

    Habitats

  • Uses many habitats, but must be moist and provide shelter. 
  • Typically found in areas of sandy, loose soil. 
  • Found at margins of bodies of water and in small seasonally wet depressions, usually under debris.
  • How to Find:

  • Listen for its explosive buzzy call “baaaaaa”, that has been likened to the “bleat of a sheep”.
  • An explosive breeder that calls at night during and immediately following “gully washers” from May to early July, it may call only a few nights per year at any one site. 
  • Look under debris (even human garbage) next to potential breeding ponds. 
  • Status

  • This is a state endangered species. 
  • If you find any please contact DNR’s Wildlife and Heritage Service.
  • Maryland Distribution Map
    Maryland Distribution Map for Eastern Narrow-mouthed Toad

     

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    Maryland Amphibian
    and Reptile Atlas Project

    "A Joint Project of the Natural History Society of Maryland, Inc. and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources"

    For monthly newsletters of the Maryland Amphibian & Reptile Atlas Project click on Recent Newsletters and scroll down to the MARA Newsletters.

    The Maryland Herpetology Field Guide is a cooperative effort of the MD Natural Heritage Program and the MD Biological Stream Survey within the Department of Natural Resources and their partners. We wish to thank all who contributed field records, text, and photographs, as well as support throughout its development.