Bear Hunters' Guide to Hunting Black Bears in Maryland

Black Bear Check-in Procedures

Pursuant to regulation, successful bear hunters are required to transport their bear to an official bear checking station by 8:00 PM on the day of the kill. However, if a hunter kills a bear and is unable to get it to an official checking station by 8:00 PM on the day of the kill, the hunter must contact the Wildlife and Heritage Service prior to the 8:00 PM deadline by calling 301-334-4255. The hunter will then have 24 hours to report to a designated bear checking station with the bear carcass.

Three bear checking stations will be in operation during the bear-hunting season:

In Garrett County, the DNR Mt. Nebo Wildlife Management Area work complex located at 1728 Kings Run Road, Oakland (at the intersection of Rt. 219) will serve as a bear checking station and will be open throughout the entire bear hunting season. 

In Allegany County, the DNR Billmeyer Wildlife Management Area work complex located at 11701 Mountain Road, Flintstone located between exits #62 and #64 off I-68 will serve as a bear checking station and will be open throughout the entire bear hunting season.

The Albert Powell Fish Hatchery located at 20901 Fish Hatchery Rd, Hagerstown, Maryland (near the intersection of I-70 and Maryland State Route 66) will serve as a bear checking station and will be open on a limited basis (see below).

Special Conditions for the Albert Powell Fish Hatchery bear checking station: 

The checking station located at the Albert Powell Fish Hatchery will only be staffed during the first two days (Monday and Tuesday) of the bear hunting season. 

For the remainder of the season (Thursday and Friday) hunters harvesting a bear in either Washington or Frederick counties may:

  • take the bear to the Allegany County checking station, or 
  • call the Mt Nebo Wildlife Office at 301-334-4255 so that arrangements can be made for DNR staff to meet you and check your bear in Washington or Frederick County.


At the bear checking stations, hunters will be asked to identify the site of the kill on a map. DNR staff will be on hand to examine bears and collect a variety of biological data used to manage the state’s bear population. Data collection at the checking station will include the extraction of a premolar tooth that will later be analyzed to determine the bear’s age and a DNA sample. Hunters will then receive an official black bear possession tag that will be affixed to each bear as proof of legal harvest.