Mobilizing To Preserve The Wye Oak
Moving aggressively to save a part of Maryland’s history for future generations, Governor Parris N. Glendening today announced a coordinated effort to salvage and preserve what remains of the State’s beloved Wye Oak Tree. The 460-year old tree was brought down during severe storms the evening of June 6, 2002. The Maryand Departments of Natural Resources (DNR), Transportation (MDOT), General Services (DGS), and Agriculture (MDA) were on the scene in Talbot County collecting bud wood to attempt to clone the tree, and collecting leaves, stems and wood to preserve and find an appropriate use to match the Wye Oak’s historic value to the State.

Wye Oak with the historical sign in the foreground
Photo by Carolyn Watson

The Wye Oak State ParkThe yellow lines highlight the two to three miles of cable used to support the Wye Oak’s massive tree branches.

The white and dark brown spots inside the tree show the decay that plagued the Wye Oak.
The white and dark brown spots inside the tree show the decay that plagued the Wye Oak. Note the hollow portions of the tree where the wood rotted away. The concrete was used to stabilize the nine-foot diameter of the trunk.

Here you see someone sorting, pruning and collecting leaves and wood buds.
A technician sorting, pruning and collecting leaves and wood buds. By preserving the Wye Oak branches with buds we may be able to clone genetically identical trees.

The yellow lines highlight the two to three miles of cable used to support the Wye Oak’s massive tree branches.
The yellow lines highlight the two to three miles of cable
used to support the Wye Oak’s massive tree branches.

The tree was carefully cut into sections and transported by trailer to a storage facility where all the parts will be saved until it is determined what will be done with the resources. The tree was carefully cut into sections and transported by trailer to a storage facility where all the parts will be saved until it is determined what will be done with the resources.
Photos by Carolyn Watson

Example of a larger piece of the fallen Oak. Another example of a larger piece of the tree.

Photos by Carolyn Watson

The tree was carefully cut into sections and transported by trailer to a storage facility
where all the parts will be saved until it is determined what will be done with the resources.


The tree was carefully cut into sections and transported by trailer to a storage facility where all the parts will be saved until it is determined what will be done with the resources. The tree was carefully cut into sections and transported by trailer to a storage facility where all the parts will be saved until it is determined what will be done with the resources.
Photos by Carolyn Watson
Drawing of a White Oak

Last updated on November 20, 2003

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