Maryland Angler's Log - Share Your Catch!

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To post a report please email your name, hometown, photos, location information, and the content for your report to fishingreports@dnr.state.md.us. All information is optional, but encouraged.

Important Note: If anyone in your picture is under 18 years of age, we must have a photo release signed by a parent/guardian before we can post your picture. By sending any photos or art to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources you are giving DNR permission to use the image(s) online and in print. You are also giving DNR permission to distribute the photo for non-commercial purposes to other media, print, digital and television for their use. You are not giving up your copyright, but are allowing the photo(s) to be used for educational and news purposes. All Photos will be made available on Fisheries Service Flickr Page.

There will be a 2013 end-of-year random drawing from angler's participating in any of the Volunteer Angler Surveys. We encourage anglers to continue to report snakehead catches through the Inland Freshwater survey in addition to their Angler's Log submission. The information helps our biologists better understand the various species and water systems they utilize.

Maryland Fishing Challenge Logo showing striped bassA new component of the Maryland Fishing Challenge includes invasive species reports submitted to the Angler's Log. Beginning during the 2013/2014 tournament, Angler's Log entries which include Blue Catfish, Northern Snakehead or Flathead Catfish, at any length in size, will be eligible for up to two prizes via a random drawing at the annual Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale. Fish must be kept and a photo showing the kept fish is mandatory. Multiple entries are allowed, but each fish can only be entered once. Remember, all invasive species must be dead to be entered and there is no catch and release category. Visit the Maryland fishing Challenge web site to read the complete set of rules.

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  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on May 31, 2012 | Permalink

Mid-Summer Trout Fishing

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Various Ponds and Creeks

It is almost June, this means 80-90 degree temperatures and too hot for trout, right? Wrong, summer trout fishing is highly underutilized in our area. Most people think that all of the fish stocked will be caught or die when the water warms up. The fact is that in suitable streams (a suitable trout stream is one where the water temperatures do not exceed 65-67 degrees) only about 50-70% of trout stocked actually get taken home for dinner. Summer decreases water levels substantially and it is a lot easier to find trout then in other months when they could be virtually anywhere. Some key features to look for when trying to find summer trout holding locations are springs, shade, oxygen (in the form of riffles), and cover or deep water. Springs can be quite difficult to find, but I have found that the best time to locate underwater springs is in the winter when there are water plants growing around them. In a stream you could walk for a quarter mile and not find any decent holding spots, or there could be a spot every 50 feet, but usually they will not be close to each other. Some great locations for mid-summer trout are Owens Creek, Antietam Creek, Friends Creek, Beaver Creek, and some that might or might not hold fish during a hot summer depending on temperatures include Middle Creek, Catoctin Creek, Fishing Creek, and Israel Creek.

Ponds, as well, are highly under-fished in the months of May, June, July, and August. In most ponds the trout will die unless there is some kind of cold water source coming in. Just this past week, I was fishing Big Hunting Creek and only landed two, and on the way back, we stopped at Frank Bentz Memorial Lake. If you had looked at the lake you would have thought there was a breeze, but that was just all of the ripples from rising fish. The fish were rising to a massive mayfly hatch in which hundreds of trout were participating. If you were to drain any pond or lake, I bet anyone would be surprised at just how many fish are left. This mid-summer trout thing is really getting popular, I urge you to go out, because you will probably catch more than you did opening day. Remember: go early or late, because later in the day the fish will go deep to retreat from the sun.

Tags: trout


  1. Alan Klotz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 64
  3. View all reports by Alan Klotz →

Posted on April 12, 2012 | Permalink

Good Fishing in Western Maryland

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake/Broadford Lake

While trout season is in full swing in Western Maryland, angling for warmwater fish species has been good as well, thanks to the warm spring we have experienced. Smallmouth bass action is picking up along the rocky shorelines of Deep Creek Lake, hitting Rapalas and Husky Jerks. Jumbo bluegills and yellow perch can be caught in Deep Creek Lake near shore at dusk using a piece of crawler fished in 4 feet of water. My son Kyle and I have also been fishing Broadford Lake in Oakland, and catching a mixed bag of rainbow trout, chain pickerel, and largemouth bass. Pictured 1) Kyle with DCL Smallmouth 2) Broadford Lake Largemouth Bass 3) DCL Bluegills and a 14.5 in Yellow Perch

Tags: smallmouth bass, bluegills, yelow perch, rainbow trout, chain pickerel, largemouth bass


  1. Alan Klotz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 64
  3. View all reports by Alan Klotz →

Posted on March 26, 2012 | Permalink

Deep Creek Lake Annual Walleye Population Survey

Type: Freshwater
Region:
Location: Deep Creek Lake

Western Region Fisheries Biologists recently conducted the annual Walleye Population Survey in Deep Creek Lake. Anglers should enjoy another great season in Deep Creek Lake (opening day is April 16) as we documented a high abundance level of adult Walleye during the electrofishing survey. Most of the Walleye were in the 16 - 18 inch size class, and we did collect a few larger fish greater than 20 inches. We also collected a large sample of Bluegills, and most of these fish were in the 8 to 10 inch size class.

Pictured are 1) Capt. Jody Johnson of the Western Region Research Vessel; 2) Fisheries Technician Terri Belasco with a large Walleye; 3) Brook Trout Biologist Matt Sell with another large Walleye; 4) Big DCL Bluegill

Tags: walleye, bluegill


  1. Matt Sell, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 16
  3. View all reports by Matt Sell →

Posted on March 13, 2012 | Permalink

Job Shadowing Experience

Type:
Region:
Location: Savage River

Yesterday a high school student joined me in the field on a job shadowing requirement for his senior project. He is interested in going to college to study something related to the outdoors, with forestry, wildlife, and fisheries being his areas of interest. The day started with some day-to-day operations before we headed into the field. Once there I walked him through a few of the current brook trout studies happening in the Savage River, including the PIT tag project on Big/Monroe Run as well as the telemetry project on the mainstem Savage River. We went through the basics of telemetry and tracked a few brook trout before heading upstream to actually tag a fish. He seemed to really enjoy the entire experience, especially tagging the fish. Besides, what a way to spend a day away from school!!!

After the work experience, I promised him some time on Deep Creek Lake to try to catch a few walleyes, including his first Deep Creek fish. Sadly, we didn't get to fish long before some steady rain set in, but we did manage to land 6 walleyes before we were chased off the lake. The water temps were 43.5 when we launched, and with the forecasted warm days, walleyes should be spawning heavily within the next week.

Tags: Brook Trout


  1. Matt Sell, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 16
  3. View all reports by Matt Sell →

Posted on March 13, 2012 | Permalink

Deep Creek Lake Walleyes (and Trout)

Type:
Region:
Location: Deep Creek Lake

I found time this past Saturday afternoon to head out to Deep Creek Lake to chase a few walleyes. The air temps at daylight were a balmy 15 degrees, so I opted to wait for the afternoon to launch the boat. Despite the cold night, the previous warm days had the water temps up to around 41 degrees, getting ever closer to perfect spawning conditions. The day started well, catching a nice 20" male on my first drift. After that, the bite was relatively slow, only hooking two others that were lost near the boat. Finally, as the evening wore on I hooked into another nice fish. To my surprise, a 21" brown trout came to the boat... a nice holdover fish from a previous year's stocking. I pulled the boat at dusk, trying to beat any potential icy conditions at the launch.

Tags: Walleye, Brown Trout


  1. Matt Sell, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 16
  3. View all reports by Matt Sell →

Posted on March 5, 2012 | Permalink

Deep Creek Walleyes

Type: Freshwater
Region:
Location: Deep Creek Lake

Thanks to the nice weather I got my new boat out for its inaugural run on Deep Creek Lake this past Tuesday afternoon! I had the entire lake to myself, and the weather was gorgeous… for sunbathing more-so than fishing. It was dead calm, so learning my new ride was the priority. I did manage to land a nice healthy 19” walleye and lost one other before time to leave though. The producer was an 1/8th ounce jig swum slowly just off the bottom in 15-20 feet of water. The takes were both very subtle, only feeling a slight tap and some weight. The fish is a gravid female, but with water temps from 37-38 degrees, spawning is still a little way off.

Tags: Walleyes


  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on November 1, 2011 | Permalink

Pangborn Pond Fishing Rodeo

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Pangborn Pond, Carroll Creek, and Owens Creek

Eeen,eeen eeen, there goes my alarm at 6:30. I wake up to snow falling in the street lights. I was for sure the rodeo was going to be canceled but it went on. We arrived up at Hagerstown about 8:30 and didn't see anyone. After a walk around the pond we spotted the registration table.And at 9:00, the rodeo started and so did the snow. Before 9:00 it wasn't snowing up there...yet. Although there were only 2 other kids at the rodeo it was really enjoyable. But, at about 9:35 the snow kept getting harder and thicker. The rodeo was stopped and they handed out the prizes. I caught 6 Rainbow Trout all in the 10-13" range but one was about 16" or so. I got most, biggest, and smallest fish of the competition. (Well, I caught the only fish of the competition.) I won a Mitchell Avocet II, it's an UL rod that sells for $30.00 at Walmart. I also won like $15.00 or $25.00 in fishing tackle (mostly Trout tackle). The Trout were holding in about 8 feet of water, near the bottom. Although I sometimes could see the Trout come up to get something off of the surface. They were all near a deep dropoff. I was casting farther than them and bringing the lure back in front of them. You know you did good at a Rodeo if an adult fisherman asks what lure you were using :) We got a cup of coffe at Sheetz and headed back to the pond once the snow calmed down a little. I caught two more Rainbows, and lost a couple. I crimp down my barbs for Trout so that it makes for an easier release although, 1 or 2 Trout might get off of the hook while playing 'em. 20 minutes in, 2 guys come in (obviously way over 16) and they start fishing. I did not want to see them catch any (since it would be against the law) and I left. As soon as I left they went and fished where I fished since they saw me catch one. All fish were released. Here's a couple reports from earlier this week. Sorry, no pics.

I've been waiting for Carroll Creek to be stocked all summer and fall, I couldn't wait, I only had about an hour to fish it because of the pouring rain. It's great if you just want to catch fish. This stream is for the blind and under 16 only, so it doesn't receive as much pressure as some of the other streams. Parts of the stocked area are remote, for instance right below the Route 15 bridge it's very hard to get through to the creek and cast. And above the Route 15 bridge is Waterford Park that I haven't been to yet, so I'll have to check it out. But from Fairview Ave. downstream to the dam on N Bentz street it is very easy access and provides plenty of room for the kids to cast. We parked beside Culler Lake and walked downstream to W College Terrace Road and I fished my way upstream. I was mostly Fly-fishing with Black Woolybuggers sizes 8-12 because you can catch a bunch of chubs on them too. I landed 8 Trout, all in the 10-13 inch range with the exception of two, one being 8'' and the other was about 15''. Also caught a couple chubs. I caught most of them Fly-fishing but a few on my finesse tackle. I fished a 3 1/2 foot BPS UL Rod with a Flueger Trion GX-7. The short rod helped out in some places where you have only a couple feet to cast. I used a 12'' Fluoro leader, although it probably didn't matter this early in the season, but it is a necessity later in the winter for catching more fish. This stream also has a lot of Sunfish and a few small Largemouths. Most fish do eventually get caught after a couple months, but I have caught a couple in the summer. All fish were released into their (new) home.

Owens Creek- We stopped by the Roddy Road Covered Bridge first and with no hits it was off to the mid section. I fished right above where there was a landslide a couple months ago. After doing the regular finesse tactic with no hits I decided to Fly-fish with Woolybuggers. All of a sudden my line went slack and...and I set the hook, and I had a big one on. After about 30 seconds of fighting him, he made a "v" right for me and he shook out the hook. There are some nice Wild Browns in this stream and some nice holdover stocked fish, of course it also could've been a holdover stocker that they just stocked. I changed my fly to a #4 Brown Woolybugger, and nothing. I headed upstream and managed about a 12-13'' Rainbow on my finesse tactics. The Bown was released after a hard fight of him running in and out of the current. Another great day in the Catoctin Mts.

Tags: Rainbow Trout, Brow Trout, chub


  1. Alan Klotz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Garrett County
  3. Total Reports: 64
  4. View all reports by Alan Klotz →

Posted on October 27, 2011 | Permalink

Deep Creek Lake Fall Sampling

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

Anglers – don’t stow away your fishing gear for the season - fishing Deep Creek Lake can be quite rewarding this time of the year! The Western Region crew pulled an all-nighter, sampling the lake from dusk to dawn earlier this week, and the amount and variety of fish we collected was amazing. The fish are in the fall feeding frenzy and most all of the gamefish were in very good condition. Nice-sized walleye (including a trophy 10 lb fish) were collected in every sample station and the amount of young of year walleye suggest a record year-class was produced. Chunky smallmouth bass and largemouth bass up to 4 lbs were collected. Jumbo-size yellow perch in the 10 to 13 inch range were common. Chain pickerel were abundant in each station, some measuring more than 20 inches. Northern pike are showing up more frequently in our samples, the largest was a thick-bodied fish that bottomed out our scale.

Tags: Gamefish, Smallmouth Bass, Walleye, Northern Pike, Chain Pickerel, Yellow Perch


  1. Matt Sell, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 16
  3. View all reports by Matt Sell →

Posted on August 3, 2011 | Permalink

Deep Creek Lake Walleye

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

Fishing has been steady for the walleyes on DCL the past few weeks. Getting fish in the boat hasn’t been a problem, and a surprising number of 15”+ fish are coming up as well. I won’t share all of my “secrets”, but targeting main lake points using a combo of trolling and casting has proven most effective. Just because surface temps are over 80 now, don’t be discouraged, just adjust tactics! Plenty of chunky 12-14” smallmouth are also happy to volunteer as a ‘by-catch’, so to speak with the associated pickerel that are always willing to bite. The occasional large yellow perch is a nice bonus as well, with plenty of 11”+ fish around for the taking!

Good luck out there and be safe with the boat traffic!!!

Tags: Walleye

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