Maryland Angler's Log - Share Your Catch!

Maryland Angler's Log Logo showing image of Angler

To post a report please email your name, hometown, photos, location information, and the content for your report to fishingreports@dnr.state.md.us. All information is optional, but encouraged.

Important Note: If anyone in your picture is under 18 years of age, we must have a photo release signed by a parent/guardian before we can post your picture. By sending any photos or art to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources you are giving DNR permission to use the image(s) online and in print. You are also giving DNR permission to distribute the photo for non-commercial purposes to other media, print, digital and television for their use. You are not giving up your copyright, but are allowing the photo(s) to be used for educational and news purposes. All Photos will be made available on Fisheries Service Flickr Page.

There will be a 2013 end-of-year random drawing from angler's participating in any of the Volunteer Angler Surveys. We encourage anglers to continue to report snakehead catches through the Inland Freshwater survey in addition to their Angler's Log submission. The information helps our biologists better understand the various species and water systems they utilize.

Maryland Fishing Challenge Logo showing striped bassA new component of the Maryland Fishing Challenge includes invasive species reports submitted to the Angler's Log. Beginning during the 2013/2014 tournament, Angler's Log entries which include Blue Catfish, Northern Snakehead or Flathead Catfish, at any length in size, will be eligible for up to two prizes via a random drawing at the annual Maryland Fishing Challenge Finale. Fish must be kept and a photo showing the kept fish is mandatory. Multiple entries are allowed, but each fish can only be entered once. Remember, all invasive species must be dead to be entered and there is no catch and release category. Visit the Maryland fishing Challenge web site to read the complete set of rules.

search the logs: 

  1. Alan Klotz, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 60
  3. View all reports by Alan Klotz →

Posted on April 19, 2013 | Permalink

Deep Creek Lake Walleye and Yellow Perch

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

The Annual Deep Creek Lake Walleye Survey was recently conducted by the Western Region Fisheries staff, and the lake continues to support a very abundant Walleye population. We obtained a catch per unit effort (or number of Walleye per hour of electrofishing) of 185 Walleye per hour. Most of the Walleye were males in the 16 to 18 inch size class. The Walleye season opened on April 16th, with a 15 inch minimum size, and a 5-fish daily creel limit. Anglers should target shallow rocky areas after dark using Rapalas or live minnows for best results. We also collected a lot of jumbo perch in the shallow shoreline areas, and using worms fished under a slip-bobber should work well. Yellow Perch regulations in Deep Creek Lake include a 10-fish daily creel limit, no size restriction, and a year-round open season.

Pictures include my daughter Jessica with a jumbo Yellow perch, my son Kyle with a nice Walleye, and the electrofishing boat live-well full of temporarily stunned fish ready for weighing and measuring before being released back into the lake.

Tags: Walleye, Yellow Perch


  1. Matt Sell, Fisheries Biologist
  2. Total Reports: 16
  3. View all reports by Matt Sell →

Posted on January 29, 2013 | Permalink

Ice Fishing Deep Creek Lake

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

This past Sunday a few friends joined me for the first trip onto the ice at Deep Creek Lake for the season. After the nice cold snap, ice conditions were finally good enough to safely fish, with thicknesses ranging from 4-7”. The fishing was a little slow, but steady, putting around 15 perch on the ice over about 7 hours of fishing. We also picked up two young northern pike and two small walleyes. Roughly half of the fish came on tip-ups, and the other half jigging.

Overall, it was a great day with beautiful weather and everyone had a blast. Especially the young man in the pictures, as it was his first ice fishing trip! I understand that he is very excited for his next trip onto the ‘hardwater’! Regrettably, the warm weather and rain may put a halt on ice fishing – at least for the near future. Anglers should be very cautious and check conditions before heading onto the ice again!

Tags: yellow perch, walleye, northern pike


  1. Drew Miller, Recreational Angler
  2. Total Reports: 1
  3. View all reports by Drew Miller →

Posted on November 26, 2012 | Permalink

Deep Creek Fish

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

These photos are from a recent fishing trip to Deep Creek Lake with my father. I had a great day catching a mixed bag of gamefish including 4 and 5 pound largemouth bass, chunky smallmouth bass, and a northern pike. I was fishing a suspended jerk-bait.

Tags: largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, northern pike


  1. Marcial Amigo, Recreational Angler
  2. Edgewater, Maryland
  3. Total Reports: 6
  4. View all reports by Marcial Amigo →

Posted on November 26, 2012 | Permalink

Annapolis Pickerel in November

Type: Tidal
Region: Southern
Location: Annapolis Creek

On Saturday morning on a hunch and curiosity— I headed for my favorite pickerel hole in downtown Annapolis. I wasn't expecting much in mid November but was curious to see if anything was still in the creeks. I started casting in a spot that was productive all summer— a shallow, rocky and grassy area just 25 to 30 feet from shore. With a slow and fast retrieve of a rooster tail spinner bait, the first of 4 pickerel took the lure. On micro tackle these guys felt like little muskies— thrashing and jumping several times clear out of the water. In a about a half an hour I had landed 4 pickerel. They were from 18 to 24 inches in length. I've caught many pickerel in the same area but this was by far my personal best. That night I went to bed thinking of Sunday.

Sunday was another pickerel morning. 2 pickerel couldn't resist the rooster tail— both were hooked within 15 minutes apart. The last pickerel caught was hefty. So the final tally for the weekend was 6 pickerel hits and 6 were landed. I was very lucky this time— usually I'll lose a couple thrashing picks in the rocks. November pickerel are AWESOME FUN! All pickerel were released and unharmed for the next lucky angler.

Question for DNR: Do the pickerel stay in shallow water all winter or do they eventually go to deeper water?

DNR Response: Chain pickerel remain active during the entire winter season, giving many die-hard fishermen an opportunity during the cold winter months. Primary locations include tidal freshwater/brackish waters as well as freshwater impoundments, chain pickerel are a target species for ice fishermen on Deep Creek Lake.

Tags: chaine pickerel


  1. Harry Readshaw, Recreational Angler
  2. Pittsburgh, PA
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Harry Readshaw →

Posted on September 27, 2012 | Permalink

40 Inch Northern Pike

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

I was drift fishing off of Holy Cross at Deep Creek Lake, with white jig head and shiner with 8 lb test line. It took 45 minutes to land this 40" northern pike.

Tags: northern pike


  1. Daniel Simon, Youth Angler
  2. Kent, OH
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Daniel Simon →

Posted on September 17, 2012 | Permalink

My First Fish

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

I went fishing with my Dad at Deep Creek Lake on 9/11/2012 and caught my first fish a 10.5" smallmouth bass.

Tags: smallmouth bass


  1. Michael Siesky, Recreational Angler
  2. Hopwood, PA
  3. Total Reports: 1
  4. View all reports by Michael Siesky →

Posted on September 13, 2012 | Permalink

Deep Creek Northern Pike

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

I caught a citations sized, 39" northern pike on August 4th at Deep Creek Lake.

Tags: northern pike


  1. Terri Belasco, Fisheries Service Technician
  2. Total Reports: 11
  3. View all reports by Terri Belasco →

Posted on July 31, 2012 | Permalink

Seining for YOY Bass in Deep Creek Lake

Type: Freshwater
Region: Western
Location: Deep Creek Lake

“The Boss (Alan Klotz, Fisheries Western Region Manager)” sent us out on a miserable rainy day to seine for young of year (YOY) smallmouth and largemouth bass. There were some squabbles in the vehicle as we headed to our destination of Deep Creek Lake as to where we should begin. It ended as my co-worker Marcus Wilson stated “If you don’t check the weather station then you don’t have a say on where we go, its like, if you didn’t vote then just be quiet!” With that, a decision was made. We started by Cherry Creek Cove.

Captain Jody Johnson (Fisheries Biologist), Fisheries Technicians Marcus Wilson, Kenny Wampler, and myself headed out and conducted the fish reproductive success seine net surveys in the lake. Cursory results show that smallmouth bass reproductive success as determined by the number of young of year (YOY) per 50 foot seine haul was one of the highest abundance ratings to date. Largemouth bass reproductive success was rated as “good”. Yellow perch were abundant, with some seine hauls containing more than 100 YOY yellow perch. Other YOY species included bluegills, chain pickerel, golden shiners, pumpkinseeds, brown bullheads, and yellow bullheads.

As for my co-workers and myself, we survived the miserable weather, and it turned out to be a pretty good morning. I Love My Job!

Tags: smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, yellow perch, bluegills, chain pickerel, golden shiners, pumpkinseeds, brown bullheads, and yellow bullheads


  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick, MD
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on June 12, 2012 | Permalink

Fishing on Frank Bentz Memorial Lake

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Frank Bentz Memorial Lake

Frank Bentz Memorial Lake is a small sediment filled pond in Thurmont Md, named after a great fisherman and one of the founders of The Brotherhood of the Junglecock, Frank Bentz Sr. The lake doesn't get much more than six foot deep and you can wade out into the middle of the lake where Big Hunting Creek flows into the lake. Wading out to the middle is the ideal fishing location as you can easily cast anywhere in the lake, during the height of stocking season, the pond becomes littered with anglers catching their limit. During opening day every year, you will not be able to find a spot on the lake even at 5:30 am

When stocking settles down there are lots of trout leftover, and these fish will feed on all of the insects that wash down from Big Hunting Creek, plus the many hatches of mayflies that occur in the lake. The fish will be positioned in six inches of water feeding on incoming insects, so you should wade out carefully and cast to each rise.

Late May or early June are prime times for fly fishing for these trout which can be caught on a variety of mayfly patterns. I also have had some great luck fishing a size 14 or 16 princehead nymph, be sure to add a little Xink to make the fly sink down quicker and you have a greater chance of letting the fish see your nymph.

This outing, I landed several and missed a ton, it can be hard to get the hook set on fish that you are casting to 50 feet out. Play the fish quickly not to scare the others. If you don't see risers after you land one, give it a break and head down to below the dam for some smallmouth, which many do not know about.

Tackle: Long leaders are a necessity in order to not scare the fish; be sure to match the natch and present the fly with a delicate presentation. I usually fish a three weight here, although some fish a five in case you do hook up with one of those 26 inchers that the DNR stocks.

Summary: Many people think, "oh it hasn't been stocked in two weeks, it is no good." Well, most of the time that is not true unless the lake experiences severe hotness. NOTE: Because we have received over 90 degree temperatures several times, there will not many fish left, but the ones that do survive, are the ones that pile up to the cool spring fed water of Big Hunting Creek.

Tags: trout, smallmouth bass


  1. Devin Angleberger, Youth Angler
  2. Frederick
  3. Total Reports: 36
  4. View all reports by Devin Angleberger →

Posted on May 31, 2012 | Permalink

Mid-Summer Trout Fishing

Type: Freshwater
Region: Central
Location: Various Ponds and Creeks

It is almost June, this means 80-90 degree temperatures and too hot for trout, right? Wrong, summer trout fishing is highly underutilized in our area. Most people think that all of the fish stocked will be caught or die when the water warms up. The fact is that in suitable streams (a suitable trout stream is one where the water temperatures do not exceed 65-67 degrees) only about 50-70% of trout stocked actually get taken home for dinner. Summer decreases water levels substantially and it is a lot easier to find trout then in other months when they could be virtually anywhere. Some key features to look for when trying to find summer trout holding locations are springs, shade, oxygen (in the form of riffles), and cover or deep water. Springs can be quite difficult to find, but I have found that the best time to locate underwater springs is in the winter when there are water plants growing around them. In a stream you could walk for a quarter mile and not find any decent holding spots, or there could be a spot every 50 feet, but usually they will not be close to each other. Some great locations for mid-summer trout are Owens Creek, Antietam Creek, Friends Creek, Beaver Creek, and some that might or might not hold fish during a hot summer depending on temperatures include Middle Creek, Catoctin Creek, Fishing Creek, and Israel Creek.

Ponds, as well, are highly under-fished in the months of May, June, July, and August. In most ponds the trout will die unless there is some kind of cold water source coming in. Just this past week, I was fishing Big Hunting Creek and only landed two, and on the way back, we stopped at Frank Bentz Memorial Lake. If you had looked at the lake you would have thought there was a breeze, but that was just all of the ripples from rising fish. The fish were rising to a massive mayfly hatch in which hundreds of trout were participating. If you were to drain any pond or lake, I bet anyone would be surprised at just how many fish are left. This mid-summer trout thing is really getting popular, I urge you to go out, because you will probably catch more than you did opening day. Remember: go early or late, because later in the day the fish will go deep to retreat from the sun.

Tags: trout

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